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  • #31
    No, I just thought that maybe it would be more likely to be something MZD wrote during the same period as / that was an offshoot from his previous novel, of Leaves.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Raminagrobis
      You do both realize that it was published back in 2001, right?
      Yes, It could be tied to HoL , but because of the theme of this piece and the title , I toguht it could be related to that material. Also, Danelewski does takes his time with his writing, so 5 years doesn't seem that much to me.

      Originally posted by Raminagrobis
      I'm inclined to tend towards coming around to agreeing with you that the story gains a lot on re-reading. I still don't think it's as good as it thinks it is, though.
      That all depends on the way you approach the story. If, for example, you start reading it at midnight without wearing shoes, the outcome may be very different than if you were to read "All lights" at dusk while eating a banana in a Japanesse garden.



      Or at least, that's what perhaps someone could say Nufro would think about your idea!

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      • #33


        I wonder what I'd have thought of it if I'd read it in a universe where 17 is not a prime number...?

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        • #34
          Well depending on whether you are performing your arithmetic while swimming or while in a rowboat, the answer to arrive at could be vastly different, as could the person who owns the pencil with which you are writing, if indeed you are writing witha pencil at all while out on a lake. Which is to say, 17 is only prime if you believe it so.

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          • #35
            Ha, now I'm gonna spring up my 2 = 3 thread again.

            No, not really.

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            • #36
              Well, I guess we can pretty safely conclude All the Lights of Midnight doesn't really have anything to do with after all, eh? Heh.

              In any case, out of sheet Saturnight boredom, I sat down and read this story again. Maybe it was reading it in an actual published format (I like holding an actual book, rather than some PDF printout), but I really really enjoyed it this time, compared to the "eh, that was pretty all right." I came up with the first time.

              One things though: What does "eros" mean, exactly? or rather, that is the significance of Nufro's paper actually being called "The Physics of Eros" carry?

              The only thing I can find is that Eros is essentially the Greek's cupid. Which ties in well enough, of course.

              Is there anything else I'm missing, though?

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              • #37
                I finally got around to reading All The Lights of Midnight last night. Fun little story.

                My first impressions, on the surface it seems to be saying, "Hey! You can't trust science! It's subject to human interpretation and quite possibly misunderstanding."

                Although I get the impression of a deeper meaning as well. Our information comes by way of Danielewski quoting Livia Bassil who wrote about Nufro. We are given hardly any information about quantum mechanics and we do not know what authority Bassil has on the subject.

                For me, reading All The Lights of Midnight, I know next to nothing about quantum mechanics. How do I know that Bassil actually understands quantum mechanics enough to imply that Nufro's poem is the soul cause for the theories? Are there other findings that back up quantum mechanics? Does Nufro's writing being a poem really effect whether or not quantum mechanics is true? (I've always been of the opinion that Zampano is less trustworthy then Johnny because at least Johnny tells us when he is fabricating information, and yet it is always Johnny that gets called a liar.)

                In the same breath that we are shown that science can possibly be influenced by human interpretation we are shown that we too can be easily swayed by clever ideas that have no or little supporting evidence.

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                • #38
                  very nice posts :)

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