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  • What's with the colors

    hacked
    Last edited by turkishhacker; 09-13-2013, 12:06 PM.

  • #2
    What's with the colors

    in one interview and somewhere else i don't recall, the color blue (for ) might suggest the notion of the blue screen in movie making, that is the empty screen that film makers use to later edit in special effects.. this opens up the whole subtext about the book being a film or like a film... the blue screen is nothingness, the is about nothingness, etc. it also suggests that the book itself and/or the is like a blue screen... wherein we impress upon it all those things we either desire or even dislike... (which refers back to someone elses post about, "does the 's interior reflect the occupants feelings"... perhaps) some other INTERESTING ideas that go along with this is derek jarman's film "BLUE" which is simply a blue screen image you sit through for 90 minutes with some sound design behind it.. and also my favorite... in the footnote reference on page 133 (where it notes other books that are of similar story...) the footnote mentions the book "days between stations" by steve erickson... i read this book years ago.. it is a surreal story about a man obsessed with making a film and him using only natural light.. all through the book erickson makes reference to the color blue and the way that the film is blue, etc. these books that mzd has mentioned aren't just casual references.. i find them all (so far) to make a lot of sense... he's obviously done his homework.

    demo

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    • #3
      What's with the colors

      ...and let's not forget about Karen GREEN!

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      • #4
        What's with the colors

        ... or Navidson -- "Navy" = navy blue?

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        • #5
          What's with the colors

          Do not forget green or navy. So much inside the has to do with blue. As I have mentioned in previous posts, numbers have a great deal to do with the book...as do colors.
          Off the top of my head;
          zampano's books were pale blue. navy's well dream has blue all over it. one of the keys is blue. blue and red make purple. (see A Note On this Edition: Full Color. Second Bullet.) the phrase out of the blue more than once.
          regardless blue is a color whose hue is that of the clear sky. It is also the portion of the color spectrum lying between green and violet.
          it also means depressing, intellectual, profane, risque...bruised.

          less forget blue ink in quantity seems black, opaline, ashen, oily...yet blue.

          what color is thumper?

          i a m h e r e t o t a l k

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          • #6
            What's with the colors

            when you think about blue you might think that water is blue.
            And if you ever read the book "The Color of Water" you'd know the color of water is god.

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            • #7
              What's with the colors

              Incidentally, I found a in my copy that isn't in blue (or grey in the case of my uk paperback)

              I'll try to find it again and give you a page number.

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              • #8
                What's with the colors

                quote:
                Off the top of my head;
                zampano's books were pale blue.


                are you sure that zampano's books were pale BLUE? i seem to remember them being described only as pale... i may be wrong, please don't yell! [img]images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

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                • #9
                  What's with the colors

                  A great day indeed.

                  I can never tell if people read what I write, let alone if they understand it.

                  I added the blue part for two reasons...first, everytime I read that section in the book the phrase pale books always makes me think blue. When I picture books that have been sitting in a refridgerator for a long time...the kind of pale I think of is a pale blue. Like when something fades to the point where it's almost white but not white...and it has this tinit of blue in it. The second reason I added it was to see what people thought about the mistake. Disinformation is everywherebeaware.

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                  • #10
                    What's with the colors

                    ooo alright good, i was just making sure i didnt miss an obviously vital detail... cuz when i heard the phrase "pale books" i automatically thought white, almost translucent... to each his own, i suppose

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                    • #11
                      What's with the colors

                      Actually, if you think about it, the four colors red, yellow, blue and green reappear several times within the book. First, and most obviously, there's the text. Second, The four keys are those colors, and there's a Whalestoe Letter from April 5, 1986 talks about the colors of the pills Pelafina is supposed to take -- "madder, azure, celadon, gamboge." (red, blue, green, yellow) Within the NR, I know two of these colors occur -- Navy for blue and Karen for Green. Has anyone found names that represent red or yellow?
                      I've thought about the kids, but I don't think this pans out. Though daisies have yellow centers, their petals are white. Chad is not a collor as far as the American Heritage Dictionary is concerned.
                      Navidson's feet are infected with some skin condition that makes them red and his toenails yellow (p. 86); this disappears once he escapes the . But feet don't equate to a person.

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                      • #12
                        What's with the colors

                        Francis, in my copy of the red edition every word is gray...

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                        • #13
                          What's with the colors

                          For me the Blue is something that makes me immedeately think of the play of Blue Leaves by Jon Guare. There are a few details that could be simi similar to the characterization in the play. For me at least the apperance of the word is somehow reminiscent.

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                          • #14
                            What's with the colors

                            i searched but was unable to find any names that coincided with the colors red or yellow, perhaps i just missed something but i feel that maybe these colors were left out for a reason? perhaps? in art we learn that the colors are divided into warm and cold colors. I find it interesting that both "green" and "Navy" are cold colors while red and yellow are warm colors. perhaps this is purely coincidence but the lack of warmth from colors could be another symbolic representation of the coldness of the place, both figurativly and literarly. the only warmth in any name that i can find or allude to is tom. Tom as in " tom cat" that is. it is a common mental picture of a warm cozy night sitting in fromt of the fire sipping hot chocolate witha cat nearby or even on your lap. but thats a strech, i may be totally off base, but hey, thats what i get out of it.

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                            • #15
                              What's with the colors

                              I think the emphasis on color in the book is significant. It brought to mind a number of things I've read and seen in the past. For instance, Plato considered color to be an 'ornament' that obstructs truth. He likened it to a drug (pharmakon) that acts as both a medicine and a poison.

                              In Hegel's Aesthetics, however, he writes that "shape, distance, boundaries, contours, in short all the spatial relations and differences of objects appearing in space, are produced in painting only by color ...It is incredible what color can really achieve in this way."

                              It also made me think of the Krzysztof Kieslowski trilogy, Red, White, and Blue,where the colors of each set the tone of the film and represented an ideal (liberty, fraternity, etc.) Other interesting uses of color in film include The Wizard of Oz,Pleasantville, Wings of Desire, Lost Highway, etc. where the changes from black and white to color (or vice versa) denote a change in conciousness, awareness, or different states of being.

                              In the specific example of HOL tho, I think that the reason colors were used is due to the vagueness associated with describing color. Color eludes language and culture - you cannot describe the experience of color. (We attempt to overcome this problem by applying some sort of logical order to color - the color wheel, the color spectrum.)

                              Wittgenstein highlighted this open-ended nature of describing color by stating that a color named at one point in time can be unrecognisable at another. Just like the different kinds of "pale" different readers interpreted...

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