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Leftwrist Twists

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Raminagrobis
    *spoilers ahead*




    I think what is charted here is the gradual, reciprocal movement from absolute valuation of self at the expense of other towards absolute valuation of other at the expense of self. That progressive inverse correlation is written into the narrative on both sides at all stages. And at the centre the two sides of the valuation are bound together in 'our' and the fluctuations momentarily stabilize, anchored by Gold, the symbolic guarantor of true value.

    Also, it is surely no accident that there are 60 mentions of the Leftwrist Twist in total.
    Nicely done - I was getting a sense of that in the narrative, but wasn't following the twists so closely.

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    • #17
      I would love a chart like that for the plants and the animals, and the cars as well...nice work!

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      • #18
        Can't believe your "capacité de lecture et d'analyse" Rami !
        You're really great !
        "Respect" comme disent les "djeuns"

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        • #19
          And how about all the objects used in place of the Leftwrist Twist ie

          S99
          "At once I offer, grasiously,
          my Leftwrist Twist of Sapphire.
          But deemed beyond the worth
          of hi puling breath Derail accepts
          gratefully the Bowl and Rag."

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          • #20
            That pattern of diminishing value is a great observation. I have a question for anyone who is farther along in the book than I am. Here goes.

            So far, eveything I've read follows this pattern. Sam views himself as smooth, and Hailey as clumsy. Hailey sees herself as smooth and Sam as clumsy. Don't have the book with me, but I'm speaking here of their driving abilities, and just about everything else. Hailey is a sort of ragged farmer in Sam's eyes, and vice versa. You get my point, right? Anyway, my question is this: Could that be directly connected with the value of the Leftwrist Twist? And if so, as time goes on, do they view eachother with great value, and see themselves as shit? If that's the case, I think it calls for discussion.

            And I apologize if its already being discussed in another thread. Can't find it, if it is.

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            • #21
              superhuman

              While I can see the currency connection, it always seemed to me like the various Leftwrist things were vague superpowers. Like the leftwrist platinum would do one thing, the leftwrist ruby another, and so on. But hey, being rich is like a superpower to(o?), isn't it?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by aslidsiksoraksi
                While I can see the currency connection, it always seemed to me like the various Leftwrist things were vague superpowers. Like the leftwrist platinum would do one thing, the leftwrist ruby another, and so on. But hey, being rich is like a superpower to(o?), isn't it?
                It is my experience that kids born into poor families can often times have more drive and endurance then those kids that are born into rich families. Sure having money can make things easier for them because they can have material things readily available to them. Then again those same material things can be achieved by poor kids too, with a little hard work and determination, leaving them with not only the materials but also a sense of self worth and accomplishment.

                I guess whether or not someone believed being rich is a superpower would depend on how much worth they placed on speed of material gain over character building.

                As an example lets say we examine two sets of kids unrelated to the book traveling across the country. The first set are two rich kids, everywhere they stop they gas up on daddy's gas card, and buy food on his credit card, they see the sights, go dance at a few clubs, and move on. They get a flat tire, and are caught with out a spare, AAA is there in about an hour, and all is great. They move on all smiles and laughter. They finish, go home, and the trip is soon forgotten. Replaced by the surprise of plane tickets to the Alps from their parents.
                Now, two poor kids are doing the same thing, in each of the states, one of the cities they stop in they find temp work to earn their gas and food money for the next leg of the journey, while working they meet some locals, who show them around, and really teach them the local history, sometimes they move on leaving new found friends behind, sometimes maybe they dealt with hard people, but they've made it to their next location, and when the tire goes flat, and there is no spare, the 20 mile walk to the next town, to find a toe truck is just another one of those things you have to do, to get where you wanna go. When they finish their trip they end up on a dock, and what the hell, maybe they can find work on a ship headed for London.

                If you saw the two poor kids in a crowd, they might be standing there quiet, slight smile, but their eyes would gleam like they've touched the stars, and in a way they have, they've done what would have seemed impossible to them months ago.

                My aim in this post is not to say rich people are bad and poor are better, or that all people of these types are like this, but you have to wonder about the teen I was talking to Saturday morning at the bus stop, he was asking me if I knew how much cabs generally cost. His reason, he wasn't comfortable walking the 15 minutes home, at 10 o clock at night, in a good neighborhood.

                Not very superpower like.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by nicolae
                  That pattern of diminishing value is a great observation. I have a question for anyone who is farther along in the book than I am. Here goes.

                  So far, eveything I've read follows this pattern. Sam views himself as smooth, and Hailey as clumsy. Hailey sees herself as smooth and Sam as clumsy. Don't have the book with me, but I'm speaking here of their driving abilities, and just about everything else. Hailey is a sort of ragged farmer in Sam's eyes, and vice versa. You get my point, right? Anyway, my question is this: Could that be directly connected with the value of the Leftwrist Twist? And if so, as time goes on, do they view eachother with great value, and see themselves as shit? If that's the case, I think it calls for discussion.

                  And I apologize if its already being discussed in another thread. Can't find it, if it is.
                  EDIT: I originally had a bit of a tantrum here, but looking again I see you are asking for "more" than what is listed by Ramino earlier on in this thread.

                  You can look here and especially here.
                  Last edited by modiFIed; 09-18-2006, 10:41 AM.

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                  • #24
                    clarification

                    My point wasn't that rick kids > poor kids or anything of the sort. Simply that having a lot of money is helpful in the way that a superpower might be. Of course, there are character issues involved and such, and I completely agree with you that children born with silver plated umbilical cords are perhaps less capable on their own. But again, money doesn't talk, it screams. A rich man/woman can obviously pull various strings that the less fortunate cannot, no matter how he came into his wealth.

                    It seems to me that every time the leftwrist turns are mentioned it is an attempt (successfull or otherwise) to change the current state of affairs. And money (or whatever currency you wish) isn't always what seems to be implied - at least not to me.

                    Also, about the minerals and gems and whatnot. How much of that is actually important? Maybe it matters that each refers to themselves as one, and the other as another (mineral/gem), but I think that if you looked for meaning in all that, you may be falling victim to overanalysis. Though, with MZD you can never tell. My opinion is that this switching off only serves to further cement the cyclical nature of the characters - they are symbolic of the (american?) teenage plight, and as such are eternal (thats why they stay 16).

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by aslidsiksoraksi
                      My point wasn't that rick kids > poor kids or anything of the sort. Simply that having a lot of money is helpful in the way that a superpower might be. Of course, there are character issues involved and such, and I completely agree with you that children born with silver plated umbilical cords are perhaps less capable on their own. But again, money doesn't talk, it screams. A rich man/woman can obviously pull various strings that the less fortunate cannot, no matter how he came into his wealth.

                      It seems to me that every time the leftwrist turns are mentioned it is an attempt (successfull or otherwise) to change the current state of affairs. And money (or whatever currency you wish) isn't always what seems to be implied - at least not to me.

                      Also, about the minerals and gems and whatnot. How much of that is actually important? Maybe it matters that each refers to themselves as one, and the other as another (mineral/gem), but I think that if you looked for meaning in all that, you may be falling victim to overanalysis. Though, with MZD you can never tell. My opinion is that this switching off only serves to further cement the cyclical nature of the characters - they are symbolic of the (american?) teenage plight, and as such are eternal (thats why they stay 16).
                      My purpose was not to suggest that poor kids were better off then rich kids. I agree money can pull certain strings, but also being poor or more ingrained in the culture of a town can pull just as many strings. There are some neighborhoods were if you found yourself wandered into and you're made of money, you could not buy your way out, they would just kill you and take everything, where as a poor person, or someone the locals might be with, would probably walk through unharmed.

                      I know its cliche by now, but money can't buy everything.

                      As to the mineral or gem not having any meaning I beg to differ. As Rami pointed out here the value diminishes for the self and grows for the other, which is a perfect example of how in a relationship one grows to be more dependent on the other person, as well as seeing more and more of their valuable attributes.

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                      • #26
                        leftwrist twists

                        Very true about the rich people in certain neighborhoods, I honestly hadn't thought of that.

                        I didn't mean that the gems had no meaning. Undoubtably there are patterns, such as the one you mentioned, to be analyzed. And they all add up to one thing: a cycle. Hailey falls more and more in love with Sam, just as he falls more and more in love with her, and this is reflected in their growingn respect for eachother, even at the cost of their own self-respect (is that the right word?).

                        But perhaps examining the peculiar properties of the leftwrist tin as compared to the leftwrits ruby is going to far. And since no one has done that yet, the point is mute (moot?).

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by heartbreak
                          I know its cliche by now, but money can't buy everything.
                          But money can buy everything that is for sale, and those happen to be things most people want.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by sutrix
                            But money can buy everything that is for sale, and those happen to be things most people want.
                            Ah, but not the things people most want.

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                            • #29
                              It is always seemed to me that the leftwrist twists conferred nobility or their status. When they were working at that restaurant in St. Louis, Hailey mentioned that Sam would do whatever menial task they asked him to, like cleaning up the messes they made on purpose, despite his leftwrist twists. Not sure if that's been mentioned or is helpful in anyway, it's just an observation.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by aslidsiksoraksi

                                But perhaps examining the peculiar properties of the leftwrist tin as compared to the leftwrits ruby is going to far. And since no one has done that yet, the point is mute (moot?).

                                Ah. Now I understand what you were driving at. We won't know until someone does take a more indepth look.

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