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  • Zietgeist?

    Or just a coincidence? You decide.

    This thing sounds like a cross between HOL and OR, with a little Requiem thrown in.

  • #2
    Originally posted by modiFIed
    Or just a coincidence? You decide.

    This thing sounds like a cross between HOL and OR, with a little Requiem thrown in.
    more info here.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by modiFIed
      Or just a coincidence? You decide.

      This thing sounds like a cross between HOL and OR, with a little Requiem thrown in.
      Huh.

      Maybe I'm just noticing them more nowadays, but it does seem that tricksy narratives have been much in vogue of late--or, at least, they have been more mainstream(ed).

      And--just pickin' on you, mind--I think the rule is, "i before e, except after z."

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      • #4
        well ...

        anybody actually read this book then ?
        it looks nice, i think i'd like it, but i'm afraid it could be too much like HoL...
        or is it ???
        what to do... heeeeelp

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        • #5
          I've read it, thanks to seeing it mentioned here of course; it's really nothing like HoL, or for that matter.

          I'd say it's closer to Auster's New York Trilogy, and apparently the author drew heavy inspiration from W.G. Sebald.

          The narrative's actually not too tricky; it does tie up at the end, so you aren't left scratching your head. And it's not really much of a surprise, either.

          But it was pretty decent, and a quick, fairly enjoyable and relatively easy read. I finished it in a day.

          I'd say go for it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by John B.
            And--just pickin' on you, mind--I think the rule is, "i before e, except after z."

            It's a word borrowed from German, so no English guidelines apply. (A language having a "rule" is silly, isn't it? especially since no language I've seen has a single rule without exception.) From what I remember from a year of German in High School, the pronounced vowel in the "ei"/"ie" combinations is always the latter vowel. So "ei" makes /aɪ/ and "ie" makes /i/ (IPA). But I'm pretty sure that this has an exception or two. A linguist could put this in much better terms.

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            • #7
              Nietzsche
              Einstein

              Edit: incidentally, I'm pretty sure John knows that. 'Z' has special connotations around here, you know.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by fearful_syzygy
                Nietzsche
                Einstein

                Edit: incidentally, I'm pretty sure John knows that. 'Z' has special connotations around here, you know.
                Well . . . he was just pointing out Modi's typo and trying to make a joking reference to the English spelling "rule" "'i' before 'e' except after 'c'." He is ignorant of whatever spelling rules there might be governing German orthography. He thought he was being clever; given, though, the rule (one with no exceptions that he's aware of) that if one has to explain the joke it does not become funnier, he realizes that perhaps he was mistaken as to his cleverness.

                Ah well. He's appreciative of Fearful's benefit of the doubt and will now stop cluttering up this thread.

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