Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Translating the Olde English?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Translating the Olde English?

    Any help here? My COED doesn't seem to help with that...

  • #2
    The search function might, though.
    As will Appendix II-F, at least partly.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by fearful_syzygy
      The search function might, though...
      You could be gentle ...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by fearful_syzygy
        The search function might, though.
        As will Appendix II-F, at least partly.
        I must be bad at using the search function
        a search for 'Old' and 'English' did not give me the thread that Nash cites.
        and a search for 'extion' and 'me' didn't give me any of the threads you found elsewhere
        I suck at teh internet.

        Thanks for your help, though.

        Comment


        • #5
          At least you tried... SF use is a black art.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Dr. Perfect
            a search for 'Old' and 'English' did not give me the thread that Nash cites.
            and a search for 'extion' and 'me' didn't give me any of the threads you found elsewhere.
            As zakalwe said it can be tricky finding what you're looking for around here, especially if you're searching for something as vague as "old" or "me". The trick is to try various combinations and permutations of words. For instance, if you search for "old english" specifying "forum: of Leaves" and making sure to select "Search for all terms", it comes up near the bottom of the second page of hits. Admittedly it takes a little bit of wading to find it, but what do you expect when searching for two such common words?
            The same goes for "extion me". If you search for those two words, even with the precautions above, you get nothing of consequence. However, a search of "zampano tom" yields far greater dividends.

            Obviously you can't be expected to be a master searcher the moment you turn up here. Even lifers like me and Nash are sometimes unable to find things even if we know exactly what we're looking for. But again as zakalwe said, at least you tried, which is more than can be said for a lot of newbies.

            Welcome aboard.

            Comment


            • #7
              Don't listen to him. He's a spy.

              Oh, wait. He's agreeing with me. Clever...

              Comment


              • #8
                According to my English teacher's Olde English Glossary the craziness on page 601 translates as follows: Mind be of use bcause the hear is resolute, therefor you spirit is obligated, because more therefor our strenght is small. I didn't say it makes sense, but that's what we think it says.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Page 653:
                  Hige sceal þē heardra,__________heorte þē cēnre,
                  mōd sceal þē māre,__________þē ūre mægen lȳtlað.447
                  The Battle of Maldon
                  ________________
                  447"By as much as our might may diminish, we will harden our minds, fill our hearts, and increase our courage." — Ed.
                  Correct me if I'm wrong here (since I'm only basing this on that translation and my knowledge of Icelandic), but 'Hige' means 'minds', 'heardra' means 'harden', 'heorte' means 'hearts', 'mōd' means 'courage', and 'lȳtlað' means 'decreased'. So you can see how it fits together, more or less.
                  Last edited by fearful_syzygy; 02-15-2009, 08:10 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I was wondering if the International Phoenetic Alphabet is a way of translating the "Olde English"? I went and bought the COED and in the front there are all the pronunciation symbols that look like the so-called old-english characters in the book. Also, some of the aids in understanding the pronunciations actually use the word "daisy" to demonstrate how to pronounce the phonemes. It's not a coincidence that the name Daisy is a character, do you think? I know I saw a discussion about this before, just can't find it now.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I assume you're thinking of this old post.

                      As for using the IPA to 'translate' Old English, I don't think you're on the right track. It can certainly help you pronounce it, but it won't help you understand it, any more than looking up the phonetic spellings of the German or French passages will help you understand them, unless you speak German or French.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        fearful synergy, you are very perceptive in ways you have yet to grasp....
                        Have you ever watched a child learning to read, how they sound out the parts of the words before they actually end up putting it all together and pronouncing the word correctly? You can see THAT moment where they recognize the word and they have conquered it...when they realize how simple the word really was...I wonder if pronounced out loud, would we then recognize the words tehy are supposed to be in olde english? Could it then be translated? Factor in that spelling wasn't standardized until more recently.
                        But still...why is Daisy in the intro of the COED?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by poco loco
                          fearful synergy, you are very perceptive in ways you have yet to grasp....
                          Perceptivity is certainly at issue here, it's true.

                          As for Daisy, who knows why they picked that word for the COED. It's certainly curious, but I would be slightly cautious about setting up a direct correlation between that and the character's name until I'd seen an earlier edition of the COED which MZD might have seen at the time of writing.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It hadn't occured to me that the edition of the COED the MZD used was probably different that the one I recently purchased. Now I wonder if his version did have Daisy in it? Do we know which version of COED MZD used?
                            And actually on page 595 Pelafina wrote to Johnny that he would need more than the COED to translate, he actually needs some olde english "under his belt."
                            Isn't Olde English a kind of beer they sell in 40 ouncers? Just wondering if maybe it's a pun?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by poco loco
                              he actually needs some olde english "under his belt."
                              Perhaps that's just Johnny's interjection; he really, badly, totally needs to meet that English chick.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X