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  • Johnny's Buttons

    I realize that there is a thread with buttons in the title but that one has more to do with Morse Code.

    I'm wondering about those infamous buttons that scattered on floor.

    Given Johnny's way of misinterpreting the world around him, how might the buttons represent something other than mere buttons?

    Finding the missing lead from the bullet on the second of the two collage pages brought me here. Where? To a hypothesis; To a wondering-- the corduroy's coat/jacket's buttons. There are two types of buttons that come to mind when I think of the corduroy coats I've seen:

    That '70s blazer has sort of dome-shaped, perhaps wooden buttons. The heavy material needs something more substantial than the wafer like buttons used on, say London Fog raincoats. If they're the wooden ones with that sort of knot shape, maybe that relates to the Yggdrasil Tree- relating to life while it lives.

    The type of corduroy jacket I had once had bore buttons similar to those on a denim jacket with words emblazened in a circular format not unlike some of the strange text on one of the pages in HoL and in a similar fashion as the words that describe the caliber/calibre on the flat end of a bullet. This would relate to death or maybe a false sense of power (recall why he kept those guns, holding on to them).


    The way in which the buttons make appearances in the book is really not that different from the way people and places have been brought up and we see people and places and times redefined or muddled in Johnny's words.

    Maybe the buttons make this a kind of choose your own adventure book but, then again, the missing lead in the empty shell in the collage would be foolish to overlook in such a book of clues.
    Last edited by On a Map of Swirling Cord; 11-17-2008, 02:24 AM.

  • #2
    That's crazy talk, cord. Don't you understand that the lead was Photoshopped out. They used the erase tool and, the image that was behind the lead was a layer added in from another file. Didn't you read the part about how Adobe-savvy Johnny/Zampano was?

    Yep.

    Comment


    • #3
      There's a reason no one replied to your thread.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you for sharing.

        Comment


        • #5
          I feel you're reading into it a bit too deeply. the only mention that was made of the buttons were that they had disappeared.

          In an abstract sense if could mean that Johnny was beginning to come apart at the most vulnerable point (his hunger for fighting was returning and his sharp concentration (that he used for making 5 or 9 point needles) gave way in favor of whim and all that came with it).

          Or it could relate to how Navy was found by Karen stripped of his clothes, as the darkness slowly strips everything from anything within its depths until there is no longer evidence that the depths still exist; not quite oblivion, but about as close as the is going to get.

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          • #6
            Corduroy= cord of the king

            There's a reference to the 'suicide king' the King of Hearts by Johnny. The line (forgive me for not having the book on me at work) also says something about the second person clueing-in on to what he is doing...as if it is a dark secret.

            So, you're saying that, when the buttons are gone, he's like Navy at his most vulnerable? I could buy that, especially since Navy is, for the majority of the story, very empowered and noble and more of a go-getter (not so vulnerable). Kingly, I suppose.

            The buttons were 'sewn' back on at some point, though. Without mention to any sutures that I can recall. More needle work, I suppose.

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            • #7
              Everything has chains.
              Absolutely nothing's changed.
              Take my hand, not my picture, spilled my tincture...

              Comment


              • #8
                Stop with the Kerouac, Cord. Especially if you're trying to make some sort of point.

                The loss of trivial objects usually isn't an issue unless they're all gone.
                Old Man Z'd know that.

                And I'm assuming "corduroy" is an anglicisation of "corde du roi"? No relevance, really. I'm just satisfied I recognized it.
                Last edited by Karuvitomsk; 11-18-2008, 01:34 PM.

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                • #9
                  Hmm, what should everyone do at the same time on this topic which has been discussed multiple times...









                  ignore

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                  • #10
                    FYI:
                    corduroy, n. and a.

                    [A name app. of English invention: either originally intended, or soon after assumed, to represent a supposed Fr. *corde du roi ‘the king's cord’; it being a kind of ‘cord’ or corded fustian.

                      No such name has ever been used in French: on the contrary, among a list of articles manufactured at Sens in 1807, Millin de Grand Voyage d. Départ. du Midi I. 144 enumerates ‘étoffes de coton, futaines, kings-cordes’, evidently from English. Wolstenholme's Patent of 1776 mentions nearly every thing of the fustian kind except corduroy, which yet was well known by 1790. Duroy occurs with serge and drugget as a coarse woollen fabric manufactured in Somersetshire in the 18th c., but it has no apparent connexion with corduroy. A possible source has been pointed out in the English surname Corderoy.]
                    Last edited by fearful_syzygy; 11-18-2008, 03:06 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fearful_syzygy
                      FYI:
                      corduroy, n. and a.

                      [A name app. of English invention: either originally intended, or soon after assumed, to represent a supposed Fr. *corde du roi ‘the king's cord’; it being a kind of ‘cord’ or corded fustian.

                      No such name has ever been used in French: on the contrary, among a list of articles manufactured at Sens in 1807, Millin de Grand Voyage d. Départ. du Midi I. 144 enumerates ‘étoffes de coton, futaines, kings-cordes’, evidently from English. Wolstenholme's Patent of 1776 mentions nearly every thing of the fustian kind except corduroy, which yet was well known by 1790. Duroy occurs with serge and drugget as a coarse woollen fabric manufactured in Somersetshire in the 18th c., but it has no apparent connexion with corduroy. A possible source has been pointed out in the English surname Corderoy.]
                      I saw that. Next thing you know you'll be stamping out misinformation.

                      Or something.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well that's nifty, ain't it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I mean, not that that necessarily means anything. Just because it's a folk etymology doesn't mean it's not a common assumption; quite the contrary.

                          Even so, Monsieur Corde de Suerle here has seemingly constructed his own private language of allusions and metaphors on which to base all of his posts. This is at least the fifth post (nay, thread) in which this so-called Suicide King (him and all his silly suicide k'niggets) is mentioned, and of course he managed to slip a reference to heroin in there without anyone even noticing. It's impressive really, this ability to construct entire webs of meaning out of thin air like that.

                          It's also kind of psychotic.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by fearful_syzygy
                            and of course he managed to slip a reference to heroin in there without anyone even noticing.
                            I think everyone noticed. I'm almost sure of it. :|


                            Edited for copy/paste failure. Twice.
                            Last edited by Rryssa; 11-18-2008, 06:02 PM.

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                            • #15
                              I'm not sure what the Pearl Jam reference was but, no, not out of thin air. The King of Hearts is referenced. If I have to read through the book to get the page number I will...eventually. The King of Hearts is nicknamed "The Suicide King". Wiki it. As far as buttons go, you show me a thread addressing the subject without it relating to a different subject.
                              I'm trying to make sense of why the author chose a corduroy coat as opposed to another material. Again, not out of thin air. There is all that stuff about materials in olde English but, why bring it up again, right? I might expect some more McCain-style selective listening.

                              As far as serif fonts being less legible than sans-serif, here's what Wiki has to say on the topic:

                              "In traditional printing serifed fonts are used for body text because they are considered easier to read than sans-serif fonts for this purpose.[1] Sans-serif fonts are more often used headlines, headings, and shorter pieces of text and subject matter requiring a more casual feel than the formal look of serifed types"

                              and, with a background in newspaper, that's how I'd always experienced the font issue.

                              Reading further in Wiki I found "While in print serifed fonts are considered more readable, sans-serif is considered more legible on computer screens." Again, I'm old school like that so, here's your sans-serif. Nice and easy.
                              Last edited by On a Map of Swirling Cord; 11-18-2008, 07:47 PM.

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