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  • No Period, and Page 433

    I didn't find an appropriately relevant place to post the first one, but on page 386, there's no period after the word house where it ends the last full paragraph on the page.

    On page 433 (and a search for this page yielded only French posts, so I'm putting it here ) creates an odd pattern. At first I thought it resembled Yggdrasil, because of the text at the bottom, where it seems to branch off into three sections,
    but looking at it as I write this, (I had just come across one of fearful_syzygy's threads looking for possible discussion of the missing period) I thought of Pelafina's letter.

    ??

  • #2
    Originally posted by OriginalIdea
    …on page 386, there's no period after the word where it ends the last full paragraph on the page
    Yes. Do you have any thoughts as to why the full stop is missing?

    Originally posted by OriginalIdea
    … page 433 … creates an odd pattern. At first I thought it resembled Yggdrasil, because of the text at the bottom, where it seems to branch off into three sections, but looking at it as I write this, (I had just come across one of fearful_syzygy's threads looking for possible discussion of the missing period) I thought of Pelafina's letter
    While I notice some resemblance to Pelafina’s letter of September 19th 1988, with the text being mainly centered on the page, I see the format of page 433 more as perhaps a visual representation of what is going on in the text at that point in time.

    For instance, when Navidson photographs the flares, the horizontal and vertical space between “photographs” “the twelve” and “flares” comes across to me as something of a representation of the timed exposure. I can almost hear the click of the camera on reading each of the three words, as if the photographs are being taken as I read.

    It appears to me that the words “Navidson or the three flares are moving” might form the streak of the flares that is mentioned in reference to the third image. The word “moving” is presented vertically, which, in the context of the layout and content of the text, gives me the impression of movement.

    Could the layout of the words at the bottom of the page form an image of the tripod on which Navidson's camera is fixed?

    Comment


    • #3
      You know what, that makes a lot more sense. I had just finished a couple of other posts where I was much more thorough and must have been tired to not notice the bottom/tripod. hehe Illustrating things the way MZD does, it's interesting to see an occassion where he has (successfully, it would seem) illustrated the movement of the flares. Especially since, represented two-dimensionally, they would be moving up the page and the text moves down it.

      With page 386, I noticed it as I was reading the first time, because I'm accustomed to Stephen King doing that in such a way that I have also come to do in writing, leaving out punctuation to link a flashback or something:
      "All she could think about was her father. That day
      David kneeled in front of her, a look on his face that told of something she didn't want to imagine." (It's kind of dark, but so's the story I took it from.)
      But I don't see the two connected in quite that fashion. The best thing I could come up with was that the sentence says precicely this:
      "His twin brother died there along with two others whom he had personally welcomed into the house"
      Perhaps an illustration of the lack of closure at the loss?

      Comment


      • #4
        I had been wondering whether footnote 358 on page 385 might be relevant to the case of the missing full stop. It mentions that “while bits and pieces of these readings still circulate, they have yet to appear anywhere in their entirety”, although I think it’s probably bit of a stretch to relate this to an absent punctuation mark. Perhaps something else is missing? Maybe another clause to the sentence, or another line or so to the paragraph? I can’t, however, see any indication that the sentence and paragraph aren’t complete, apart from the lack of full stop.

        I much prefer your idea that the missing full stop could be illustrative of lack of closure. That makes more sense to me. Thank you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Actually, you raise a good point. This 'lack of a full stop' occurs within one of the three theories. They haven't, yet, been published in their entirety, maybe there is something missing.

          Something else I just thought of: The unfinished sentence is one where it is being pointed out the people that died due to Navidson's own invitation. We've already got a number of examples of Johnny Truant altering the text. Page 552 has a note (in Johnny's font) where he mensions changing the text to include the deaths of the two children. Perhaps page 386 is the result of Johnny actually changing the text and then deleting the change, somehow. A change that the Editors, then, do not catch.

          Comment


          • #6
            This reminds me of a story I think I saw on Reading Rainbow one time (so it may or may not be an actual Chinese folktale). There's a kid (I think it's set in China, but I could be wrong) who either is magical or has a magical paintbrush. He's a really good painter, and when he finishes painting whatever he has painted comes to life. He doesn't want people to know about his power so, he always paints things with something missing.

            One day, he paints a crane, but leaves out the eye. Somebody startles him and he accidentally drops a blob of ink where the eye should be. The crane comes to life and everyone finds out about his ability. I don't remember what happens after that.

            I couldn't find the actual name of the story, or anyone else's version on the web, so that'll have to do for now (unless anyone else knows what I'm talking about). There is, of course, a large, mysterious period on pg. 709 which could be a belated attempt to fill in the gap. Plus, there seems to be a lot of accidental ink throughout.

            It's probably not an intentional tie-in, but it's an interesting story anyway.

            Comment


            • #7
              No, no. I like that. To use that story as an analogy is to say that of Leaves is intentionally incomplete; if it were, the answer would be given away [too easily].

              I had kind of seen some symbolism on page 709, a filled circle at the top, a hollow one at the bottom. "doesn't reach the ground ... Its roots must hold the sky."
              Now if the dot at the top is a period, you could say that it is the last punctuation mark, but Yggdrasil comes after that. That even after everything you consider, Yggdrasil is still the bottom line.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: No Period, and Page 433

                Originally posted by OriginalIdea
                I didn't find an appropriately relevant place to post the first one, but on page 386, there's no period after the word house where it ends the last full paragraph on the page.
                This could possibly be of some use.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nice. Thanks. I'm going to have to read through that. I do have something else to add to this (was listening to Exploration Z again), but I'd like to read through that thread, first.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There is a full stop (period) after on p. 386 in the UK Edition. So the simple answer is that it's a typo in the US (Blue) Edition (MoleculaRR, can you verify that it's missing in the red edition as well?). But then since when are there any simple answers? This is, after all, not the only incongruity between the B&W and colour editions. I suppose you could argue that they simply forgot to print the tick on p. 97 in the former...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have the red edition from the later print run, and the period is there. So yes, definitely a typo.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you for mentioning that, f_s and pwhite.

                        I hadn't thought to take a look at my black and white Dutch edition. It doesn't normally help much. Had I looked, I would have noticed that there is, indeed, a full stop in the appropriate place.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Oh, boooo.

                          And I was about to comment on the interesting reference in TNR during Exploration A:
                          Originally posted by Zampanò
                          Still, no matter how far Navidson proceeds down this particular passageway, his light never comes close to touching the punctuation point promised by the converging perspective lines, ...
                          Oh, well. It was almost interesting.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yeah, I guess I should have looked sooner. My Red's got the period. Wait, actually, so does my Blue (though I think it's the later Blue printing). Both of the period's look odd, though, like they were added in later by hand.

                            Anyway, I don't necessarily think that because the printings are different that the first one is a typo. Even if it is, it's still worthing talking about.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't know why, but I only just remembered this:

                              Was talking with—I believe—fatwoul some time ago about things missing, house in black, etc.; and it was said that these were, indeed, mistakes corrected in later editions.

                              Mine is 13th, bought ordered in late '04, and still has the black house on p. 708. Did I just get a fluke of a reprinting, or are some of these actually supposed to be this way?

                              Comment

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