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  • Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

    Yes, I searched, and I'm frankly surprised this didn't turn up.
    As I was Concordancing this evening, I came across this passage:

    Of course, curiosity killed the cat, and even if satisfaction supposedly brought it back, there's still that little problem with the man on the radio telling me more and more about some useless information. But I didn't care. I just turned the radio off. (xviii)

    Yes: we get a snippet from the first verse of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones. But what is even more interesting, given this point in Johnny's account of his growing involvement with TNR, is the line in the song that immediately follows what is quoted here, and which Johnny (conveniently?) leaves out: "Supposed to fire my imagination." Johnny's imagination by this time is more than stoked, so no wonder what he hears is "useless" to him. And more: his turning the radio off is his first gesture in the direction of isolating himself from others.

    So, then: has anyone else noticed quotes from songs in HoL? What/where are they? And what do you think their connection(s) to the text might be?

  • #2
    Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

    There was a recent thread on the French forum on this very subject, I think it was this one. They mention 'When Johhny comes Marching Home', 'Daisy Daisy', and (looks like MZD is more Beatles than Stones) 'I saw a film today, oh boy' (Ch. 1 epigraph, obviously); John Lennon and 'Let it Be' cited in footnotes (not sure about page numbvers). Also p.476 Navy quotes 'Help'. And p.149 Johnny almost quotes 'Help' while looking for music at a Virgin Megastore.

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    • #3
      Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

      Like I can read French.
      But, yes: I had forgotten about the quote from "A Day in the Life." I suspect there are others; the 'Stones quote was something of a surprise.

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      • #4
        Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

        The quote from "A Day in the Life" (the epigraph for Chapter I of The Navidson Record) is curious on a couple of levels that raise issues we've all seen in HoL.

        1) Attribution: Yes, The Beatles (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, to be exact). But officially--that is, legally--the attribution should read "Lennon/McCartney." And here's where things get complicated. The rule for the "Lennon/McCartney" songs is, Whoever is the primary singer on the song, actually wrote the song. Yet, on "A Day in the Life," Lennon sings the verses, but McCartney sings the bridge ("Woke up, fell out of bed/Dragged a comb across my head . . . "). Hmm. Did they actually collaborate on this song's composition? Did Lennon throw the bridge to McCartney as a sop? Although I don't know the answer and would like to, my real point is that to attribute this song to "The Beatles" is an odd thing to do. There ARE drums in it, but the song features a heavily orchestrated arrangement--no solo guitar from Harrison--and as for singing, if Harrison and Starr sing on it, they are so buried in the mix as to be inconsequential. The Beatles were a band, but musically, this sure ain't "She Loves You."
        So also with TNR: Zampano effectively creates the illusion of the existence of a primary source (the film itself), featuring real people, that has generated a wealth of secondary sources. Yet, as we are told, TNR is largely the product of one man's fertile imagination.

        2) The quoted line itself: This, of course, is obvious: a) How can one see a film that doesn't exist?; b) How can Zampano, being blind, see any film?

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        • #5
          Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

          quote:
          Originally posted by pwhite:
          Also p.476 Navy quotes 'Help'.


          Yup. And look at what follows on p. 477: the opening lines of the turn-of-the-previous-century song, "Daisy." For you
          2001: A Space Odyssey fans, you'll remember that as the song that HAL sings as he gradually loses control over the spaceship heading to Jupiter, thanks to Bowman. HAL had full control over the spaceship, and kills one of the astronauts when "he" learns that they plan to disable him. "Help!" indeed. No wonder Navy gets the two songs confused.

          Edit: I had overlooked pwhite's mentioning "Daisy" in his post. Sorry about that.

          [ June 11, 2003: Message edited by: John B. ]

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          • #6
            Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

            In this article, MZD says "Chopin, Pearl Jam, the Beatles, Johnny Cash" influenced his novel.

            Also Beethoven (Muss es sein ?) and Bach (Hofstadter).

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            • #7
              Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

              Pearl Jam and of Leaves

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              • #8
                Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

                quote:
                Originally posted by pwhite:
                Pearl Jam and of Leaves


                Yes. But in that case, it seems that the song provides a certain atmosphere (and maybe Johnny's pseudonym) but not words that get played with in the novel. Or am I missing something?

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                • #9
                  Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

                  [QUOTE]Originally posted by John B.:
                  [QB]1) The rule for the "Lennon/McCartney" songs is, Whoever is the primary singer on the song, actually wrote the song. Yet, on "A Day in the Life," Lennon sings the verses, but McCartney sings the bridge ("Woke up, fell out of bed/Dragged a comb across my head . . . "). Hmm. Did they actually collaborate on this song's composition? Did Lennon throw the bridge to McCartney as a sop? Although I don't know the answer and would like to, my real point is that to attribute this song to "The Beatles" is an odd thing to do.


                  Well...it has been explained that the song was individual song ideas BOTH John and Paul were fiddling around with ON THEIR OWN that happened to "come together"...right now, over me... [img]images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

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                  • #10
                    Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

                    Karen sings the Beatles:

                    "We often find her singing quietly to herself, anything from popular tunes, old Slavic lulliabies, to a song about how many ways her life has changed and how she would like to get her feet back on the ground" (p416)

                    That last bit comes from 'Help!' as well.

                    [ June 30, 2003: Message edited by: Stencil ]

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                    • #11
                      Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

                      And Beethoven - muss es sein? though that's not really a "song" is it?

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                      • #12
                        Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

                        "Help!" is proving to be a significant subtext in HoL--perhaps not quite the subtext that Borges' works provides, but it's certainly recurring.

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                        • #13
                          Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

                          Some further thoughts about the appropriateness of "A Day in the Life" to chapter 1 of The Navidson Record:

                          Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was, before and upon its release, the subject of intense and, quite literally, world-wide speculation as to what/whom its songs are about. There was much mystery about it before the official release, fueled by the February 1967 release of "Penny Lane"/"Strawberry Fields Forever" and the (apparently) premature release of a song called "A Day in the Life of." When the album appeared on June 2, 1967, the cover art and lyrics got a thorough going-over by fans--perhaps TOO thorough, and the Beatles themselves actively encouraged that: it was with Sgt. Pepper's that they began to plant clues of various sorts that led many to the conclusion that "Paul is dead." Was "A Day in the Life" about Paul's "death"? Perhaps about Kennedy?
                          At any rate, it seems to me that there are more than a few parallels between the reception of Sgt.Pepper's and that which Zampano imagines for TNR.

                          But what really prompted this post was my looking up the lyrics for "A Day in the Life" and thinking that the following verse seems to fit Johnny well--and, perhaps, at least a few members of this forum:

                          I saw a film today oh boy
                          The English Army had just won the war
                          A crowd of people turned away
                          But I just had to look
                          Having read the book.

                          [ July 10, 2003: Message edited by: John B. ]

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                          • #14
                            Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

                            The title of Donna Tartt's peice on Karen just before she enters the labyrinth alludes to the Beatles' "Please Please Me."

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                            • #15
                              Hey, D.J!: Lyrics from (non-POE) songs in HoL

                              Unlike John Lennon, I haven't the faintest idea how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall...

                              Anyone?

                              Z

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